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Wednesday, January 15, 2014

Vintage Thingie Thursday


Vintage Thursday is being brought to you by Coloradolady at http://coloradolady.blogspot.com.  It is a very nice way to spend the day each Thursday.


On one of my out and about ventures, I saw this container.  I had no idea what it was.  Lucky for me, it had a sign stating it was a metal, vintage, miner, railroad lunch box.  It had three layers.

 

13 comments:

TexWisGirl said...

wow. that's very cool.

Joy@aVintageGreen said...

Love the handle LaVoice. Good thing it was labeled, learn something new all the time.
Joy

Rajesh said...

Very vintage.

Patty Antle said...

Oh, I love it! I love vintage so much!

Adam said...

quite the design, you think it would hold water or something.

Healy Harpster said...

Oh, that is so interesting! What a cool find you got there. Lunch boxes these days are way different in styles.

George said...

I've seen a container like this before. I had an uncle that worked for a railroad, and he had a lunch box like this. Thanks for the memories.

Diane Jordan said...

Hi lovely lady.
Wow you are so lucky to find this I love vintage also. Thanks so much for your sweet comments on my Blue Willow tablescape. I hope you have a wonderful week with your family. God Bless "
xxoo
Diane

Pam said...

I love this but would never have guess what it really was used for. Lucky it was labeled for you.

Ivy and Elephants said...

What a cool item, LV. I have a rattan thingy like this with three compartments that I store sewing stuff in. Thanks for shedding some light on them.
Hugs,
Patti

Syam said...

Cool indeed :)

Michelle said...

I've always thought those were neat -- wonder if they make a modern version?

racheld said...

I don't know how old that lunch box is, but it would have come in really handy for my Mammaw and Grandpa back in the Twenties, when they were first married. He worked as a logger, and lived close to all the big woods they were working in.

The little town had a dummy line railroad which ran the train from town all the miles up to the woods, and the men would get on at dawn and ride to work. At noon Dinnertime, the wives of the workers would all gather down at the stop, with baskets and covered plates and bowls of dinner for their husbands, and always a half-gallon jug of cold tea for Grandpa.

The guys all had a space on the racks built into the train car, and everybody knew whose dishes (and cup-towels) were whose. The dirty dishes came home with the men at night.

Mammaw's sister had a store, and she gave her a big wooden Coke crate to carry all the stuff to the train stop in on a little cart.